jocko@usajobsnow.com

The Purpose of this post is to ALERT you that the job you are about to apply for scamalert4or may have applied FOR or is CONSIDERING APPLYING FOR is FRAUDULENT. The identities of individuals or a business entity have been stolen along with fund from their bank accounts.

These job postings are an attempt to lure you into accepting wire transfers and cashing counterfeit checks into your bank accounts. You are being recruited to wire transfer these funds via WESTERN UNION or MONEYGRAM from your bank into a DOMESTIC BANK or OFFSHORE BANK ACCOUNT.

Essentially You Become A Money or Repackage Mule

  1. Money Mule Explained
  2. Understanding The Cyber Theft Ring
  3. Protecting Yourself Against Money Mule
  4. KrebsOnSecurity – Cyberheist
  5. Washingtonpost.com by Brian Krebs
  6. Interview With A Money Mule
  7. Bobbear.co.UK ~ Historical Money Mule Sites

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Good day!

We considered your resume to be very attractive and we thought the vacant position in our company could be interesting for you.

Our firm specializes in consultation services in the matter of bookkeeping and business administration.
We cooperate with different countries and currently we have many clients in the US.
Due to this fact, we need to increase the number of our destination representatives’ regular staff.

In their duties will be included the document and payment control of our clients.
Part-time and full-time employment are both currently important.
We offer a flat wage from $1000 up to $3,500 per month.

If you are interested in our offer, mail to us your answer on jocko@usajobsnow.com and we will send you an extensive information as soon as possible.

Respectively submitted
Personnel department
_________________________________________

Good day!

We considered your resume to be very attractive and we thought the vacant position in our company could be interesting for you.

Our firm specializes in consultation services in the matter of bookkeeping and business administration.
We cooperate with different countries and currently we have many clients in the US.
Due to this fact, we need to increase the number of our destination representatives’ regular staff.

You will be responsible for shipping goods from multiple shops through our company to different places.
Part-time and full-time employment are both currently important.
We offer a flat wage from $1000 up to $3,500 per month.

If you are interested in our offer, mail to us your answer on maxim@usacareersorg.com, and we will send you an extensive information as soon as possible.
________________________________

Good day!

We considered your resume to be very attractive and we thought the vacant position in our company could be interesting for you.

Our firm specializes in consultation services in the matter of bookkeeping and business administration.
We cooperate with different countries and currently we have many clients in the US.
Due to this fact, we need to increase the number of our destination representatives’ regular staff.

In their duties will be included the document and payment control of our clients. Part-time and full-time employment are both currently important.
We offer a flat wage from $1000 up to $3,500 per month.

If you are interested in our offer, mail to us your answer on nev@usajobsnow.com and we will send you an extensive information as soon as possible.

Respectively submitted
Personnel department
______________________________

Address lookup

lookup failed: usajobsnow.com
Could not find an IP address for this domain name
Domain Whois record

Queried whois.internic.net with “dom usajobsnow.com

Domain Name: USAJOBSNOW.COM
Registrar: BIZCN.COM, INC.
Whois Server: whois.bizcn.com
Referral URL: http://www.bizcn.com
Name Server: NS1.MERCURY-LDO.NET
Name Server: NS2.MERCURY-LDO.NET
Status: clientDeleteProhibited
Status: clientTransferProhibited
Updated Date: 13-sep-2014
Creation Date: 13-sep-2014
Expiration Date: 13-sep-2015

Last update of whois database: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:16:51 UTC
Queried whois.bizcn.com with “usajobsnow.com”…

Registrar WHOIS Server: whois.bizcn.com
Registrar URL: http://www.bizcn.com
Updated Date: 2014-09-13T09:57:23Z
Creation Date: 2014-09-13T09:57:23Z

Registrar Registration Expiration Date: 2015-09-13T09:57:23Z
Registrar: Bizcn.com,Inc.
Registrar IANA ID: 471
Registrar Abuse Contact Email: abuse@bizcn.com
Registrar Abuse Contact Phone: +86.5922577888
Reseller: Cnobin Technology HK Limited

Domain Status: clientDeleteProhibited
Domain Status: clientTransferProhibited

Registry Registrant ID:
Registrant Name: Teri Werner
Registrant Organization: Teri N. Werner
Registrant Street: 3330 Bird Street
Registrant City: Trementina
Registrant State/Province: NM
Registrant Postal Code: 88439
Registrant Country: us
Registrant Phone: +1.5056415379
Registrant Phone Ext:
Registrant Fax: +1.5056415379
Registrant Email: info@usajobsnow.com

Registry Admin ID:
Admin Name: Teri Werner
Admin Organization: Teri N. Werner
Admin Street: 3330 Bird Street
Admin City: Trementina
Admin State/Province: NM
Admin Postal Code: 88439
Admin Country: us
Admin Phone: +1.5056415379
Admin Phone Ext:
Admin Fax: +1.5056415379
Admin Email: info@usajobsnow.com

Registry Tech ID:
Tech Name: Teri Werner
Tech Organization: Teri N. Werner
Tech Street: 3330 Bird Street
Tech City: Trementina
Tech State/Province: NM
Tech Postal Code: 88439
Tech Country: us
Tech Phone: +1.5056415379
Tech Phone Ext:
Tech Fax: +1.5056415379
Tech Fax Ext: Tech Email: info@usajobsnow.com

Name Server: ns1.mercury-ldo.net
Name Server: ns2.mercury-ldo.net

DNSSEC: NotsignedDelegation
URL of the ICANN WHOIS Data Problem Reporting System: http://wdprs.internic.net/
>>> Last update of WHOIS database: 2014-09-15T16:17:06Z
Network Whois record

Don’t have an IP address for which to get a record

DNS records

name class type data time to live
usajobsnow.com IN SOA
server: ns1.mercury-ldo.net
email:
serial: 1410797102
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900s (00:15:00)
usajobsnow.com IN NS ns1.mercury-ldo.net 900s (00:15:00)
usajobsnow.com IN NS ns2.mercury-ldo.net 900s (00:15:00)
usajobsnow.com IN MX
preference: 10
exchange: mx.usajobsnow.com

OIL AND GAS INVESTMENT FRAUD

OIL AND GAS INVESTMENT FRAUD
North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA) Offer These Tips:

State securities regulators around the country warn that oil and gas investment scams are alive and well. High oil prices have created a heightened interest in investments in energy-related business ventures.

Most oil and gas investment opportunities, while involving varying degrees of risks to the investor, are legitimate in their marketing and responsible in their operations. However, as in many other investment opportunities, it is not unusual for unscrupulous promoters to attempt to take advantage of investors by engaging in fraudulent practices.

Although some of the con artists moved on to more lucrative venues since the oil boom ended in the mid-1980s, many continued to linger on in the oil field. Now with the constant fluctuation of oil prices, some of these people have made their way back to these kinds of scams. When there is a highly publicized economic circumstance, which creates an opportunity for money to be made legitimately, scamsters follow in the shadows to take advantage of the situation.

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WHAT ARE OIL AND GAS INVESTMENTS?

Oil and gas investments take many forms, including limited partnership interests, ownership of fractional undivided interests in leases, and general partnerships. Tax consequences and investor liability vary according to the type of program. True general partnerships in which investors actively participate in the operations of the venture are not securities. A general partner, however, is personally liable for partnership debts.

In a drilling limited partnership, an oil or gas company sells partnership units to investors and uses the money it raises to lease property and drill wells. In return for managing the project, the sponsor company usually takes an upfront fee that averages about 15-16% of one’s investment (commonly referred to as tangible and intangible drilling costs) and also shares in a percentage of any revenue generated. In return, the promoter offers the investor the prospect of a substantial first year tax write-off and quarterly cash distributions from the sale of any oil and gas the partnership finds until the wells run dry.

Drilling partnerships have always been a gamble, but recently, they have proven somewhat riskier than usual. This type of investment is very speculative, is a highly illiquid investment and can have a long holding period.

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FRAUDULENT SALES TECHNIQUES

Fraudulent oil and gas deals are frequently structured with the limited partnership (or other legal entity) in one state, the operation and physical presence of the field in a second state, and the offerings made to prospective investors in states other than the initial two states. Thus there is less chance of an investor dropping by a well site or a nonexistent company headquarters. Such a structure also makes it difficult for law enforcement officials and victims to identify and expose the fraud.

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BOILER ROOMS & INTERNET PITCHES

In order to attract the interest of potential investors, unprincipled promoters frequently use the Internet and “boiler room” offices with banks of phones manned by salespeople with little or no background in energy exploration, but plenty of experience in high-pressure sales. Their techniques include repeated unsolicited phone calls to members of the public, hyping the profitability of the deal. Some swindlers use professionally designed brochures. Beware of unsolicited oil and gas promotions on the internet and through e-mail. State securities regulators caution potential investors to beware of the following claims in a typical high-pressure sales pitch, whether through unsolicited telephone calls or e-mail messages:

– You will have an interest in a well that cannot miss;

– The risks are minimal;

– A geologist has given the salesperson a tip;

– The salesperson has personally invested in the venture;

– The promoter has “hit” on every well drilled so far;

– There has been a tremendous “discovery” in an adjacent field;

– A large, reputable oil company is operating or planning to operate in the area;

– Only a few interests remain to be sold and you should immediately send in your money in order to assure the purchase of an interest;

– This is a special private deal open only to a lucky chosen few investors.

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INVESTOR CHECKLIST: HOW TO AVOID BEING SWINDLED

State securities regulators advise potential investors not to be afraid to ask the hard questions when solicited for oil and gas investment opportunities. Investors wanting to make oil and gas investments should consider oil exploration and producing companies which are well-established and listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

You can minimize the risk of being swindled if you resist pressures to make hurried, uninformed investment decisions. There are several steps you should take before parting with your money. State securities regulators have developed a checklist of five key areas to examine before investing.

1. The Registration Requirements. Ask if the offering is filed with the office of the state securities commission in your state or the state in which the promoters are located. If so, contact that agency for any information it may be able to provide. If the promoter claims that the offering is exempt from registration requirements in the particular state in which the offers and sales are made, find out which of the exemptions is claimed and the terms of the exemption.

Contact the state securities agency to confirm that the offering is indeed exempt. If the promoter claims a security is not involved at all, find out why and contact the state securities agency and confirm whether it really is a security being offered.

2. The Salesperson. If it is a legitimate deal, the salesperson will not be reluctant to answer questions or provide written explanations to questions. Ask the name of the person offering you the security, where he is calling from and his background, particularly in other oil or gas ventures. Ask what commission and/or other compensation the salesperson will receive.

Contact your state securities agency to find out if the promoter or salesperson has been sanctioned for previous violations of securities laws.

3. The Company. Ask the names of the principals of the company or the general partners offering the security, their backgrounds and experience in the oil and gas industry, and how long they have been associated with the company. Find out the history of the company, its capitalization, assets and retained earnings. What contingent liabilities does it have from other ventures? Does it have sufficient funds to cover unexpected costs? Is the tax treatment of the investments, as claimed by the promoters, supported by the Internal Revenue Service?

Find out the company’s or general partners’ history in drilling operations. In particular, ask how long it has been in the oil and gas business, the number of wells drilled, the number of wells completed as producing wells, and whether the company retained its interests in the wells it drilled. Determine if conflicts of interest involving the promoter are disclosed. All the above information should be contained in a prospectus or “offering documents” that the promoter must furnish potential investors before they commit their funds.

4. The Investment. Make sure funds raised are kept in a separate escrow account until used and that they won’t be commingled with other funds. Also, be certain the funds will not be used for purposes other than those specified. Ask how much money is to be raised and the cost per fractional interest. Ask how much of the money will pay for advertising, salaries, sales commissions and any estimated profit to the company. Ask what type of conveyance document will be provided after any investment is made.

Assuming the well is completed, ask what the completion costs will be for each investor, including additional commissions to be paid (the purpose and amount), and whether investors may be obligated to pay in more money in the future. Ask what tax incentive might be available if a dry-hole is encountered and for intangible drilling costs. Finally, evaluate the risk involved in making the investment. Is the well to be drilled a wildcat (drilled in territory not known to be productive) or is the drilling to be done in an area of proven oil reserves?

5. The Lease. Secure a legal description of the property on which the program is to be drilled. How and when was it acquired? Is the principal selling the lease to the venture at the acquisition cost, and if not, how much profit is being made? Ask for a description of surrounding property, including local well completions and a geologist’s report on the area. You will want to know if the lease is already in default and whether there is any overriding royalty or landowner’s royalty or other leasehold burden being paid.

Ask for a disclosure of the person(s) selling the lease, the cost of the lease and any relationship between the lessor and the operator. Secure a statement of the depth of the well to be drilled and an indication of when drilling is to begin. Insist on seeing a copy of the operator’s contract with the promoter.

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ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS TO ASK BEFORE INVESTING

The checklist of questions to ask and information to obtain is long and it will take time and perhaps even money invested in outside consultation before you feel comfortable risking your money in the investment. It is always advisable to seek the advice of a neutral expert before committing your funds to any investment deal. Be sure to consider the following questions:

Who will be responsible for payment of taxes? Will they be paid out of the investor’s share?

What is the location of available pipelines, or what method will be used to transport and sell any production?

What is the name and address of the operator? What is her/his experience with ventures of this nature? What are the terms of the agreement with the operator, including the compensation terms?

How will the decision be made for completing the well or abandoning it? Who will make that decision? What is to become of funds received from the salvage value of equipment on the lease?

__________________________________________________________________________

WHERE TO TURN FOR HELP

The securities administrator in your state, province or territory is responsible for the protection of investors. If you have questions about an investment, contact your securities administrator. You can locate your securities administrator on NASAA’s website by clicking here. It is a good idea to contact your securities administrator before you invest.

Source:  North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA)

Oil and Gas Scams: Common Red Flags and Steps You Can Take

Oil and Gas Scams: Common Red Flags and

Steps You Can Take to Protect Yourself

Henry . . . was a successful business man, married for 30 years, raised a family and had a good life . . . after his wife’s death, he received an [overnight] package of materials with all kinds of reports, and it was offering an oil and gas investment . . . And it was unsolicited. . .  he ignored it . . . But the next day, a salesman called him and used high-pressure sales tactics . . . to persuade him to invest $40,000.  And here are some examples of what was said to him on the phone:  “These gas wells are guaranteed to produce $6,800 a month in income;” “Some of the most successful investors in the country are interested in these wells;”  “There are only two units left in this project;” “We drilled a well in Texas that had these same early gas readings, and the investors all made millions.” . . . Over a three year-period, Henry was recontacted 12 times and invested, essentially, his life savings in 4 different gas wells, each time thinking that he had to invest or lose his original investment . . . He ultimately lost over $500,000 to this oil and gas scam investing in wells that always seemed promising at first  . . .

    – Description of an oil and gas scam victim at the SEC’s first-everSeniors Summit (July 2006)

If you think you’ve found the right oil or gas investment to “strike it rich,” consider this:  it may be a scam.  While some oil and gas investment opportunities are legitimate, many oil and gas ventures are frauds.  Many of these schemes start in so-called “boiler rooms,” where skilled telemarketers use high pressure sales tactics to convince you to hand over your hard-earned money.

Once they have your money, scam artists pay themselves first, often using funds to pay personal expenses.  In the end, only some of your money may be invested in an actual oil or natural gas well, or none at all.

Red Flag Warnings

If you are considering an oil and gas investment, look for these “red flag” warnings of fraud:

  • Sales Pitches Focused on Highly Publicized News. Scam artists read the headlines, too.  Often, they’ll use a highly publicized news item, like volatile gas prices, to lure potential investors and make their “opportunity” sound more legitimate.
  • “Can’t Miss” Wells. Every investment carries some degree of risk so you should be skeptical of any oil and gas investment opportunity pitched as completely safe.  Fraudsters often spend a lot of time trying to convince you that extremely high returns are “guaranteed” or “can’t miss.” Don’t believe it.
  • Unsolicited Materials. Be especially careful if you receive unsolicited materials about an investment.  Simply ignoring investment-related “junk” faxes, emails, voice mail messages, and regular mail may be your best strategy.  And don’t let a package full of colorful marketing materials impress you, even if it’s sent by certified or overnight mail.  If you’re not going to research an opportunity fully, do yourself a favor and put any unsolicited materials in the recycle bin immediately.  If someone calls to follow up regarding the materials, tell him or her “thanks, but no thanks” and hang up.  [Hanging up is critical because scam artists often use scripted sale pitches to keep you on the phone.]
  • Limited Opportunities. Scam artists often try to give you the impression that the “ opportunity” they are promoting is scarce, hoping you will hand over your money hastily before doing any due diligence.  Resist the pressure to invest quickly, and take the time you need to investigate before sending money.
  • High Rates of Return. Compare promised yields with current returns on well-known stock indexes. Any investment opportunity that claims you’ll get substantially more could be highly risky. And that means you might lose money.
  • Tips or Secrets. A promoter may discourage you from talking about the opportunity with someone you trust, like a loved one, attorney or financial professional.  If that happens, stop listening, and leave or hang up.  Then, be sure to contact us.

Steps You Can Take to Protect Yourself

Here are some steps you can take to avoid being scammed:

  • Ask questions and check out the answers. Fraudsters rely on the sad truth that many people simply don’t bother to investigate before they invest. It’s not enough to ask a promoter for more information or for references – fraudsters have no incentive to set you straight. Savvy investors take the time to do their own independent research.
  • Contact state oil and gas regulatory agencies. You may be able to verify information provided in offering materials by contacting the oil and gas regulatory agency in which the wells are allegedly being drilled.  For example, these agencies generally have information about a company’s drilling history that could confirm claims of prior success.

Investor Tidbit:
You might be surprised to learn that the Railroad Commission of Texasoversees the Texas oil and gas industry.  Unfortunately, state oil and gas regulatory agencies don’t have uniform names. If you’re having trouble finding the agency that regulates oil and gas in a particular state, enter the State’s name – followed by “oil and gas” – into your favorite Internet search engine. The appropriate agency should be listed near the top of your search results. If you are still having trouble, call us at (800) 732-0330.

  • Research the company before you invest. You can contact thesecretary of state where the company is incorporated to find out whether the company is a corporation in good standing.  You also will want to understand the company’s business and its products or services before investing.  Before buying any stock, check out the company’s financial statements on the SEC’s website, or contact yourstate securities regulator. All but the smallest public companies have to file financial statements with us. If the company doesn’t file with us, you’ll have to do a great deal of work on your own to make sure the company is legitimate and the investment appropriate for you. That’s because the lack of reliable, readily available information about company finances can open the door to fraud.  Remember that unsolicited materials should never be used as the sole basis for an investment decision.
  • Know the salesperson. Spend some time checking out the person touting the investment before you invest – even if you already know the person socially. Always find out whether the securities salespeople who contact you are licensed to sell securities in your state and whether they or their firms have had run-ins with regulators or other investors. You can check out the disciplinary history of brokers andadvisers quickly – and for free – using the SEC’s and FINRA’s online databases. Your state securities regulator may have additional information.

If you encounter a problem with an oil and gas investment, you can send us your complaint using our online complaint form atwww.sec.gov/complaint.shtml.  You can also reach us by regular mail at:

Securities and Exchange Commission
Office of Investor Education and Advocacy
100 F Street, N.E.
Washington, D.C. 20549-0213

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Remember – an educated investor is our best defense against fraud! For more information on how to invest wisely and avoid fraud, please visit theInvestor Information section of our website.

http://www.sec.gov/investor/pubs/oilgasscams.htm